Category Archives: Memos and Alerts

NICE Bites – Sore Throat & Acute Otitis Media

The North West Medicines Information Centre have published a very useful synopsis of recent NICE guidelines on antimicrobial prescribing for upper respiratory tract infections. NICE Bites 107 summarises NICE NG 84: Acute Sore throat and NICE NG 91: Acute Otitis Media. Both aim to limit antibiotic use and reduce antimicrobial resistance, emphasising the low risk of complications and Continue Reading »

Resources to support safer modification of food and drink

NHS Improvement have issued a Patient Safety Alert to highlight patient harm linked to misunderstandings about, or imprecise application of terms used to describe thickened fluids or food texture. The Patient Safety Alert also draws attention to the requirement for local plans for transition to international standardised terminology in the NHS and across the UK – with links Continue Reading »

Updated Antimicrobial Prescribing Guideline

An updated version of the antimicrobial prescribing guideline for primary care in the North East & Cumbria is now available:  Version 4 incorporates changes made to the Public Health England document: Management and treatment of common infections –  Antibiotic guidance for primary care as well as recent guidance from NICE on management of self-limiting respiratory tract & ear infections.

Quinine – QT prolongation risk & interactions

Despite repeated warnings about an unfavourable balance between risks and benefits, prescribing of quinine salts in NECS stakeholder CCGs has remained remarkably constant in recent years. The MHRA have issued a reminder about the potential for quinine to effect the QT interval,  along with updated information about interactions – particularly with anticonvulsant drugs. Advice for healthcare professionals: be Continue Reading »

NHSE & NHC CC OTC QRG

NHS England & NHS Clinical Commissioners have published a quick reference guide (QRG) to Conditions for which over the counter items should not routinely be prescribed in primary care. The OTC QRG sets out the reasons for recommending that certain treatments of limited clinical effectiveness, or used for conditions that are either self-limiting or suitable for self-care, should not be routinely prescribed in primary care Continue Reading »